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This category contains 11 posts

“I’m Mad as Hell…”: Brazilian Protests in Comparative Perspective

By Peter Kingstone Pope Francis’ visit to Brazil has come and gone largely without incident. By most accounts, it was a tremendous success and the new pontiff’s modesty and positive message was well received both in Brazil and abroad. Security officials expressed concern about the Pope’s desire to move openly and worried about the risks … Continue reading

Germany, the Euro and the Euro Crisis

by Thiess Petersen   In a recent article, Alexander Reisenbichler and Kimberly J. Morgen argue that ‘Germany won the Euro Crisis’[i]. I doubt that any country can be the winner of a major economic crisis, especially if we are talking about an exporting nation. Of course Germany does benefit from some economic developments of the … Continue reading

Global Corruption, Global Protests: The Odds of Success Against the System

By Laurence Cockcroft   Corruption has featured heavily in the rounds of street-led protests over the last three years, and in some cases much earlier. Sometimes the protesters have focused directly on the corruption issue (as in Indonesia, Egypt and Russia); in other cases there has been a stronger focus on issues such as profligate … Continue reading

Have International Financial Institutions Improved?

By Franziska Wehinger Has the Performance of International Financial Institutions in Dealing with “Post-Conflict” Societies Improved Since the mid-1990s? Introduction As Jonathan Stevenson points out, “International Financial Institutions’ efficacy cannot make a peace process, but International Financial Institutions’ inefficacy can break one.”[1] Indeed, the engagement of International Financial Institutions (IFIs), namely the International Monetary Fund … Continue reading

Religion in the EU : How Many Divisions ?

By François Foret Sociologists present Europe as “an exceptional case” to the extent that religious beliefs and practices have declined there more than in any other part of the world. It does not mean that religion is disappearing. On the contrary, it is becoming more visible in the political and public arenas, in new, individualised … Continue reading

What are the Prospects for the United Nations?

By Joshua Colebourne At times prospects for the United Nations have seemed bleak, but at other times the United Nations has embodied endless opportunity for many people. In this piece of work I will attempt to understand the relationship between international society and the United Nations, the history of the United Nations and its perceived … Continue reading

Civil Resistance, Transformative Nonviolence and the State

By Iain Atack, Nonviolent political action has played a significant role in achieving social and political change in the last century, and continues to be a vital feature of many campaigns for democracy, human rights and social justice. Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King were prominent proponents of nonviolence in the twentieth century, but nonviolent … Continue reading

An Examination of Decisions to Intervene in Libya and Syria

Why did the International Community Decide to Intervene in Libya, yet not in Syria? by Paul Stokes “The Middle East is a region where fools rush in, but wise men fear to tread.” – Leon Carl Brown This essay will explain why two countries, Libya and Syria – and two leaders, Muammar al-Gaddafi and Bashar … Continue reading

Would More Female Leadership Lead to Less Global Conflict?

Would a World In Which Women Dominated Key Leadership Positions Contain Less Violent Conflict? by Mia Lombardi The impact of gender on international security has come under much scrutiny in recent years, with divergences between the influence of socially-constructed gender or biologically-led ‘sex’ taking a key focus. This essay will examine whether one can evaluate … Continue reading

Failed Humanitarian Intervention in East Timor

Failed Humanitarian Intervention in East Timor: A Bottom-up Hypothesis by Katherine Green The two decades since the end of the Cold War witnessed a new generation of warfare, which in turn gave rise to the parallel evolution of two diametric paradigms—ethnic conflict, and its consequential international response, humanitarian intervention. The hope for peace and prosperity … Continue reading